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The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) at the ACSHR

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) and Reproductive Health for Advancing Human Security and Enhancing People’s Wellbeing in Africa at The 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR)

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Courtesy photo - pride flag
news item

| 06 September 2018

IPPF welcomes India’s Supreme Court historic decision to free LGBTI communities from persecution

After generations of oppression under a colonial-era law, today the LGBTI community in India celebrated the scrapping of key provisions in Section 377 from the Indian Penal Code, which had previously outlawed consensual same-sex sexual relations. Following multiple legal challenges, the Supreme Court finally recognised that “158 years ago, the law deprived people of love”, and ruled that all people should be free from prejudice and persecution. A historic win for communities that have been pushed into the shadows, Chief Justice Dipak Mishra made it clear that  “any discrimination on basis of sexual orientation amounts to a violation of fundamental rights.” Welcoming this ruling, IPPF Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “Today is a historical victory for the LGBTI community in India. No longer will their human right to love, and to show that love, be violated by archaic laws. IPPF hopes that is this the first step of many to ensure that the LGBTI community are guaranteed their full fundamental rights and that social, economical, financial cultural and political inclusion of the LGBTI community becomes woven into the fabric of India’s national identity.   Today's decision will bring new-found hope and energy to those LGBTI communities that are still suffering under repressive laws. I would like to thank the individuals and organizations that have fought tirelessly to make this happen. Without people fighting for change, change cannot happen.” Image by Courtesy Photo

Courtesy photo - pride flag
news_item

| 06 September 2018

IPPF welcomes India’s Supreme Court historic decision to free LGBTI communities from persecution

After generations of oppression under a colonial-era law, today the LGBTI community in India celebrated the scrapping of key provisions in Section 377 from the Indian Penal Code, which had previously outlawed consensual same-sex sexual relations. Following multiple legal challenges, the Supreme Court finally recognised that “158 years ago, the law deprived people of love”, and ruled that all people should be free from prejudice and persecution. A historic win for communities that have been pushed into the shadows, Chief Justice Dipak Mishra made it clear that  “any discrimination on basis of sexual orientation amounts to a violation of fundamental rights.” Welcoming this ruling, IPPF Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “Today is a historical victory for the LGBTI community in India. No longer will their human right to love, and to show that love, be violated by archaic laws. IPPF hopes that is this the first step of many to ensure that the LGBTI community are guaranteed their full fundamental rights and that social, economical, financial cultural and political inclusion of the LGBTI community becomes woven into the fabric of India’s national identity.   Today's decision will bring new-found hope and energy to those LGBTI communities that are still suffering under repressive laws. I would like to thank the individuals and organizations that have fought tirelessly to make this happen. Without people fighting for change, change cannot happen.” Image by Courtesy Photo

Argentina activists
news item

| 09 August 2018

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 31 in favour, 38 against, 2 abstentions, and 1 absence.     Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:   "Today, the Argentinian Senate failed women by voting to maintain a status quo that leads to anguish, forced pregnancy, and preventable death. This compassionless vote denies women’s lived experiences, evidence-based public health policies and international agreements. While the senate has demonstrated that they are out of touch, women will not retreat. Tens of thousands of women organized, mobilized, and took to the streets to support this bill, and their courage have inspired activists across Latin America to share their stories and take on the stigma that too often keeps abortion care out of public discourse. We stand firmly and in solidarity with all women until forced pregnancies become a thing of the past—until all women are treated as equals.”       While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility: Women with fewer economic and social resources have less access to care than upper-class women in urban centers.   Dr Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF’s Director General:  “Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion is decriminalized and becomes an integral part of sexual and reproductive health care. IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all. ”  

Argentina activists
news_item

| 09 August 2018

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 31 in favour, 38 against, 2 abstentions, and 1 absence.     Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:   "Today, the Argentinian Senate failed women by voting to maintain a status quo that leads to anguish, forced pregnancy, and preventable death. This compassionless vote denies women’s lived experiences, evidence-based public health policies and international agreements. While the senate has demonstrated that they are out of touch, women will not retreat. Tens of thousands of women organized, mobilized, and took to the streets to support this bill, and their courage have inspired activists across Latin America to share their stories and take on the stigma that too often keeps abortion care out of public discourse. We stand firmly and in solidarity with all women until forced pregnancies become a thing of the past—until all women are treated as equals.”       While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility: Women with fewer economic and social resources have less access to care than upper-class women in urban centers.   Dr Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF’s Director General:  “Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion is decriminalized and becomes an integral part of sexual and reproductive health care. IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all. ”  

Drug treatment for HIV
news item

| 27 July 2018

No coercion in treatment options for women living with HIV

International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) responds to new World Health Organization (WHO) antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommending dolutegravir (DTG)-based treatment for women and girls. The drug’s high success rate has led to DTG rollout in many countries for people living with HIV globally than other current first-line treatment options. IPPF is concerned the guidelines could result in women living with HIV being coerced to use contraception or take less effective HIV treatment options. Organizations led by women living with HIV have raised concerns that the WHO recommendation undermines choice for women by placing reproductive success above treatment success. All women should make informed choices about both their HIV treatment and contraception options, including the potential risks and benefits. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General said: "We support the need for more effective HIV treatment options to be available and that the WHO guidelines have been reviewed due to safety and efficacy during pregnancy.  But with the rollout of DTG in more countries, it is vital that governments and health providers ensure that treatment options are offered through a women-centred approach. Free from any coercion of contraceptive use over HIV treatment options.    "We know that sexual and reproductive ill-health and HIV share root causes.  Better integration of HIV and sexual health care means that more women and girls can make the best choices about their health and wellbeing."  As stated in the WHO consolidated guidelines on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV, care should be provided in ways that respect women’s autonomy in decision-making about their health, and women should have the information and options to enable informed choices. Dolutegravir is a highly effective HIV integrase inhibitor with a high barrier to the development of drug resistance. Countries are shifting to dolutegravir as first-line treatment, including Botswana, Brazil and Kenya adopting DTG with many more to follow. IPPF is developing a technical brief on this new treatment guidance to be distributed to all Member Associations, and will follow the evidence and updated information as it becomes available. Latest WHO guidelines on DTG  

Drug treatment for HIV
news_item

| 27 July 2018

No coercion in treatment options for women living with HIV

International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) responds to new World Health Organization (WHO) antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommending dolutegravir (DTG)-based treatment for women and girls. The drug’s high success rate has led to DTG rollout in many countries for people living with HIV globally than other current first-line treatment options. IPPF is concerned the guidelines could result in women living with HIV being coerced to use contraception or take less effective HIV treatment options. Organizations led by women living with HIV have raised concerns that the WHO recommendation undermines choice for women by placing reproductive success above treatment success. All women should make informed choices about both their HIV treatment and contraception options, including the potential risks and benefits. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General said: "We support the need for more effective HIV treatment options to be available and that the WHO guidelines have been reviewed due to safety and efficacy during pregnancy.  But with the rollout of DTG in more countries, it is vital that governments and health providers ensure that treatment options are offered through a women-centred approach. Free from any coercion of contraceptive use over HIV treatment options.    "We know that sexual and reproductive ill-health and HIV share root causes.  Better integration of HIV and sexual health care means that more women and girls can make the best choices about their health and wellbeing."  As stated in the WHO consolidated guidelines on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV, care should be provided in ways that respect women’s autonomy in decision-making about their health, and women should have the information and options to enable informed choices. Dolutegravir is a highly effective HIV integrase inhibitor with a high barrier to the development of drug resistance. Countries are shifting to dolutegravir as first-line treatment, including Botswana, Brazil and Kenya adopting DTG with many more to follow. IPPF is developing a technical brief on this new treatment guidance to be distributed to all Member Associations, and will follow the evidence and updated information as it becomes available. Latest WHO guidelines on DTG  

UN LOGO
news item

| 20 June 2018

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC), a UN body dedicated to strengthening the fulfilment, protection and respect of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all people.    IPPF acknowledges the important role that the HRC plays in safeguarding human rights and particularly the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women, girls and the LGBTIQ+ communities, especially those who are victims of violence and discrimination, including those living in humanitarian crisis and experience marginalization and abuse.   The Human Rights Council has dedicated special procedures, panels and resolutions that have led to advancements on sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially in the areas of women’s rights, sexual and gender based violence, sexual orientation and gender identity, child, early and forced marriage, violence and discrimination against women, HIV, Female genital mutilation among others.    Ana Maria Bejar, IPPF Director of Advocacy said:   “The Human Rights Council is a central pillar of international accountability for human rights violations worldwide. A great example of that is the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), where the human rights record of all states is peer reviewed. That has been a key forum to engage member states and civil society on the protection and fulfilment of all human rights at country level.”   IPPF is a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement working in more than 170 countries to provide and enable services and champion sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served.

UN LOGO
news_item

| 20 June 2018

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC), a UN body dedicated to strengthening the fulfilment, protection and respect of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all people.    IPPF acknowledges the important role that the HRC plays in safeguarding human rights and particularly the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women, girls and the LGBTIQ+ communities, especially those who are victims of violence and discrimination, including those living in humanitarian crisis and experience marginalization and abuse.   The Human Rights Council has dedicated special procedures, panels and resolutions that have led to advancements on sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially in the areas of women’s rights, sexual and gender based violence, sexual orientation and gender identity, child, early and forced marriage, violence and discrimination against women, HIV, Female genital mutilation among others.    Ana Maria Bejar, IPPF Director of Advocacy said:   “The Human Rights Council is a central pillar of international accountability for human rights violations worldwide. A great example of that is the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), where the human rights record of all states is peer reviewed. That has been a key forum to engage member states and civil society on the protection and fulfilment of all human rights at country level.”   IPPF is a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement working in more than 170 countries to provide and enable services and champion sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served.

アルゼンチンで中絶の合法化を求めてデモをする人々
news item

| 14 June 2018

Argentina's House of Deputies approves bill decriminalizing abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian House of Deputies approved a bill that decriminalizes abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 129 in favor, 125 against and 1 abstention. The bill now heads to the Argentine Senate.    Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:  “Today, Argentina’s House of Deputies voted for women’s rights, for human rights, and for democracy. The vote paves the way for sound public policy that will save countless women’s lives and begin to pay back a debt that Argentinian society has owed to women for far too long.    We call on the Argentinian Senate to listen to the tens of thousands of women who have courageously shared their stories and marched in the streets to demand their rights. You have the opportunity and responsibility to lead this inevitable change and ensure that all Argentines should be treated as equals.”   While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility. Women with few economic and social resources, many of whom are victims of gender-based violence, and/or live in rural areas, don’t have the ability to access care and are significantly more vulnerable than upper-class women in urban centres. Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion care is decriminalized.  IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all.    

アルゼンチンで中絶の合法化を求めてデモをする人々
news_item

| 14 June 2018

Argentina's House of Deputies approves bill decriminalizing abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian House of Deputies approved a bill that decriminalizes abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 129 in favor, 125 against and 1 abstention. The bill now heads to the Argentine Senate.    Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:  “Today, Argentina’s House of Deputies voted for women’s rights, for human rights, and for democracy. The vote paves the way for sound public policy that will save countless women’s lives and begin to pay back a debt that Argentinian society has owed to women for far too long.    We call on the Argentinian Senate to listen to the tens of thousands of women who have courageously shared their stories and marched in the streets to demand their rights. You have the opportunity and responsibility to lead this inevitable change and ensure that all Argentines should be treated as equals.”   While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility. Women with few economic and social resources, many of whom are victims of gender-based violence, and/or live in rural areas, don’t have the ability to access care and are significantly more vulnerable than upper-class women in urban centres. Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion care is decriminalized.  IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all.    

国民投票の結果を見守る市民
news item

| 26 May 2018

Ireland’s Yes vote is a triumph of compassion over coercion

IPPF is overjoyed at the Irish people’s decision to remove the harmful ‘8th Amendment’ from Ireland’s constitution with today’s referendum result.   IPPF’s Director General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “ We wholeheartedly welcome this vote for change, which makes it possible for the Irish Parliament to legalise abortion care on a woman’s own indication in the first trimester of pregnancy, in line with the many other countries around the world which ensure women can access safe and legal abortion care when they need it.”   Caroline Hickson, IPPF’s European Network Regional Director, said: “As an Irishwoman, I know the 8th Amendment has harmed countless women physically, emotionally and psychologically for more than 30 years. The vote to remove it paves the way for a more compassionate and caring environment for women in Ireland. They will no longer be forced to access abortion outside the state or resort to unsafe and unregulated use of abortion pills obtained online and outside the law. Instead, women and girls who experience crisis pregnancies will be able to make personal, private decisions about their health care with the support of their doctors and loved ones. They will be able to receive proper care, in their country, when they are at their most vulnerable.”   Dr Alvaro Bermejo added: “Ireland’s decision sends a signal around Europe and the world that people’s care and compassion can triumph over absolutism and coercion. We hope that it also gives courage to women and all those who support their fight against reproductive coercion in so many other places, and to all those countries where the Global Gag Rule is having a devastating impact on access to sexual and reproductive health care. For all women everywhere, it’s time to end forced full pregnancy and make abortion care safe, legal and accessible. Today Ireland has shown us that positive change is possible.”  

国民投票の結果を見守る市民
news_item

| 26 May 2018

Ireland’s Yes vote is a triumph of compassion over coercion

IPPF is overjoyed at the Irish people’s decision to remove the harmful ‘8th Amendment’ from Ireland’s constitution with today’s referendum result.   IPPF’s Director General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “ We wholeheartedly welcome this vote for change, which makes it possible for the Irish Parliament to legalise abortion care on a woman’s own indication in the first trimester of pregnancy, in line with the many other countries around the world which ensure women can access safe and legal abortion care when they need it.”   Caroline Hickson, IPPF’s European Network Regional Director, said: “As an Irishwoman, I know the 8th Amendment has harmed countless women physically, emotionally and psychologically for more than 30 years. The vote to remove it paves the way for a more compassionate and caring environment for women in Ireland. They will no longer be forced to access abortion outside the state or resort to unsafe and unregulated use of abortion pills obtained online and outside the law. Instead, women and girls who experience crisis pregnancies will be able to make personal, private decisions about their health care with the support of their doctors and loved ones. They will be able to receive proper care, in their country, when they are at their most vulnerable.”   Dr Alvaro Bermejo added: “Ireland’s decision sends a signal around Europe and the world that people’s care and compassion can triumph over absolutism and coercion. We hope that it also gives courage to women and all those who support their fight against reproductive coercion in so many other places, and to all those countries where the Global Gag Rule is having a devastating impact on access to sexual and reproductive health care. For all women everywhere, it’s time to end forced full pregnancy and make abortion care safe, legal and accessible. Today Ireland has shown us that positive change is possible.”  

Courtesy photo - pride flag
news item

| 06 September 2018

IPPF welcomes India’s Supreme Court historic decision to free LGBTI communities from persecution

After generations of oppression under a colonial-era law, today the LGBTI community in India celebrated the scrapping of key provisions in Section 377 from the Indian Penal Code, which had previously outlawed consensual same-sex sexual relations. Following multiple legal challenges, the Supreme Court finally recognised that “158 years ago, the law deprived people of love”, and ruled that all people should be free from prejudice and persecution. A historic win for communities that have been pushed into the shadows, Chief Justice Dipak Mishra made it clear that  “any discrimination on basis of sexual orientation amounts to a violation of fundamental rights.” Welcoming this ruling, IPPF Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “Today is a historical victory for the LGBTI community in India. No longer will their human right to love, and to show that love, be violated by archaic laws. IPPF hopes that is this the first step of many to ensure that the LGBTI community are guaranteed their full fundamental rights and that social, economical, financial cultural and political inclusion of the LGBTI community becomes woven into the fabric of India’s national identity.   Today's decision will bring new-found hope and energy to those LGBTI communities that are still suffering under repressive laws. I would like to thank the individuals and organizations that have fought tirelessly to make this happen. Without people fighting for change, change cannot happen.” Image by Courtesy Photo

Courtesy photo - pride flag
news_item

| 06 September 2018

IPPF welcomes India’s Supreme Court historic decision to free LGBTI communities from persecution

After generations of oppression under a colonial-era law, today the LGBTI community in India celebrated the scrapping of key provisions in Section 377 from the Indian Penal Code, which had previously outlawed consensual same-sex sexual relations. Following multiple legal challenges, the Supreme Court finally recognised that “158 years ago, the law deprived people of love”, and ruled that all people should be free from prejudice and persecution. A historic win for communities that have been pushed into the shadows, Chief Justice Dipak Mishra made it clear that  “any discrimination on basis of sexual orientation amounts to a violation of fundamental rights.” Welcoming this ruling, IPPF Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “Today is a historical victory for the LGBTI community in India. No longer will their human right to love, and to show that love, be violated by archaic laws. IPPF hopes that is this the first step of many to ensure that the LGBTI community are guaranteed their full fundamental rights and that social, economical, financial cultural and political inclusion of the LGBTI community becomes woven into the fabric of India’s national identity.   Today's decision will bring new-found hope and energy to those LGBTI communities that are still suffering under repressive laws. I would like to thank the individuals and organizations that have fought tirelessly to make this happen. Without people fighting for change, change cannot happen.” Image by Courtesy Photo

Argentina activists
news item

| 09 August 2018

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 31 in favour, 38 against, 2 abstentions, and 1 absence.     Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:   "Today, the Argentinian Senate failed women by voting to maintain a status quo that leads to anguish, forced pregnancy, and preventable death. This compassionless vote denies women’s lived experiences, evidence-based public health policies and international agreements. While the senate has demonstrated that they are out of touch, women will not retreat. Tens of thousands of women organized, mobilized, and took to the streets to support this bill, and their courage have inspired activists across Latin America to share their stories and take on the stigma that too often keeps abortion care out of public discourse. We stand firmly and in solidarity with all women until forced pregnancies become a thing of the past—until all women are treated as equals.”       While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility: Women with fewer economic and social resources have less access to care than upper-class women in urban centers.   Dr Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF’s Director General:  “Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion is decriminalized and becomes an integral part of sexual and reproductive health care. IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all. ”  

Argentina activists
news_item

| 09 August 2018

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian Senate voted narrowly against a bill that would have legalized abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 31 in favour, 38 against, 2 abstentions, and 1 absence.     Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:   "Today, the Argentinian Senate failed women by voting to maintain a status quo that leads to anguish, forced pregnancy, and preventable death. This compassionless vote denies women’s lived experiences, evidence-based public health policies and international agreements. While the senate has demonstrated that they are out of touch, women will not retreat. Tens of thousands of women organized, mobilized, and took to the streets to support this bill, and their courage have inspired activists across Latin America to share their stories and take on the stigma that too often keeps abortion care out of public discourse. We stand firmly and in solidarity with all women until forced pregnancies become a thing of the past—until all women are treated as equals.”       While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility: Women with fewer economic and social resources have less access to care than upper-class women in urban centers.   Dr Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF’s Director General:  “Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion is decriminalized and becomes an integral part of sexual and reproductive health care. IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all. ”  

Drug treatment for HIV
news item

| 27 July 2018

No coercion in treatment options for women living with HIV

International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) responds to new World Health Organization (WHO) antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommending dolutegravir (DTG)-based treatment for women and girls. The drug’s high success rate has led to DTG rollout in many countries for people living with HIV globally than other current first-line treatment options. IPPF is concerned the guidelines could result in women living with HIV being coerced to use contraception or take less effective HIV treatment options. Organizations led by women living with HIV have raised concerns that the WHO recommendation undermines choice for women by placing reproductive success above treatment success. All women should make informed choices about both their HIV treatment and contraception options, including the potential risks and benefits. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General said: "We support the need for more effective HIV treatment options to be available and that the WHO guidelines have been reviewed due to safety and efficacy during pregnancy.  But with the rollout of DTG in more countries, it is vital that governments and health providers ensure that treatment options are offered through a women-centred approach. Free from any coercion of contraceptive use over HIV treatment options.    "We know that sexual and reproductive ill-health and HIV share root causes.  Better integration of HIV and sexual health care means that more women and girls can make the best choices about their health and wellbeing."  As stated in the WHO consolidated guidelines on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV, care should be provided in ways that respect women’s autonomy in decision-making about their health, and women should have the information and options to enable informed choices. Dolutegravir is a highly effective HIV integrase inhibitor with a high barrier to the development of drug resistance. Countries are shifting to dolutegravir as first-line treatment, including Botswana, Brazil and Kenya adopting DTG with many more to follow. IPPF is developing a technical brief on this new treatment guidance to be distributed to all Member Associations, and will follow the evidence and updated information as it becomes available. Latest WHO guidelines on DTG  

Drug treatment for HIV
news_item

| 27 July 2018

No coercion in treatment options for women living with HIV

International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) responds to new World Health Organization (WHO) antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommending dolutegravir (DTG)-based treatment for women and girls. The drug’s high success rate has led to DTG rollout in many countries for people living with HIV globally than other current first-line treatment options. IPPF is concerned the guidelines could result in women living with HIV being coerced to use contraception or take less effective HIV treatment options. Organizations led by women living with HIV have raised concerns that the WHO recommendation undermines choice for women by placing reproductive success above treatment success. All women should make informed choices about both their HIV treatment and contraception options, including the potential risks and benefits. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF Director General said: "We support the need for more effective HIV treatment options to be available and that the WHO guidelines have been reviewed due to safety and efficacy during pregnancy.  But with the rollout of DTG in more countries, it is vital that governments and health providers ensure that treatment options are offered through a women-centred approach. Free from any coercion of contraceptive use over HIV treatment options.    "We know that sexual and reproductive ill-health and HIV share root causes.  Better integration of HIV and sexual health care means that more women and girls can make the best choices about their health and wellbeing."  As stated in the WHO consolidated guidelines on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV, care should be provided in ways that respect women’s autonomy in decision-making about their health, and women should have the information and options to enable informed choices. Dolutegravir is a highly effective HIV integrase inhibitor with a high barrier to the development of drug resistance. Countries are shifting to dolutegravir as first-line treatment, including Botswana, Brazil and Kenya adopting DTG with many more to follow. IPPF is developing a technical brief on this new treatment guidance to be distributed to all Member Associations, and will follow the evidence and updated information as it becomes available. Latest WHO guidelines on DTG  

UN LOGO
news item

| 20 June 2018

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC), a UN body dedicated to strengthening the fulfilment, protection and respect of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all people.    IPPF acknowledges the important role that the HRC plays in safeguarding human rights and particularly the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women, girls and the LGBTIQ+ communities, especially those who are victims of violence and discrimination, including those living in humanitarian crisis and experience marginalization and abuse.   The Human Rights Council has dedicated special procedures, panels and resolutions that have led to advancements on sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially in the areas of women’s rights, sexual and gender based violence, sexual orientation and gender identity, child, early and forced marriage, violence and discrimination against women, HIV, Female genital mutilation among others.    Ana Maria Bejar, IPPF Director of Advocacy said:   “The Human Rights Council is a central pillar of international accountability for human rights violations worldwide. A great example of that is the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), where the human rights record of all states is peer reviewed. That has been a key forum to engage member states and civil society on the protection and fulfilment of all human rights at country level.”   IPPF is a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement working in more than 170 countries to provide and enable services and champion sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served.

UN LOGO
news_item

| 20 June 2018

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council

IPPF regrets the announcement of the withdrawal of the United States from the United Nations Human Rights Council (HRC), a UN body dedicated to strengthening the fulfilment, protection and respect of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all people.    IPPF acknowledges the important role that the HRC plays in safeguarding human rights and particularly the sexual and reproductive health and rights of women, girls and the LGBTIQ+ communities, especially those who are victims of violence and discrimination, including those living in humanitarian crisis and experience marginalization and abuse.   The Human Rights Council has dedicated special procedures, panels and resolutions that have led to advancements on sexual and reproductive health and rights, especially in the areas of women’s rights, sexual and gender based violence, sexual orientation and gender identity, child, early and forced marriage, violence and discrimination against women, HIV, Female genital mutilation among others.    Ana Maria Bejar, IPPF Director of Advocacy said:   “The Human Rights Council is a central pillar of international accountability for human rights violations worldwide. A great example of that is the Universal Periodic Review (UPR), where the human rights record of all states is peer reviewed. That has been a key forum to engage member states and civil society on the protection and fulfilment of all human rights at country level.”   IPPF is a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement working in more than 170 countries to provide and enable services and champion sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served.

アルゼンチンで中絶の合法化を求めてデモをする人々
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| 14 June 2018

Argentina's House of Deputies approves bill decriminalizing abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian House of Deputies approved a bill that decriminalizes abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 129 in favor, 125 against and 1 abstention. The bill now heads to the Argentine Senate.    Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:  “Today, Argentina’s House of Deputies voted for women’s rights, for human rights, and for democracy. The vote paves the way for sound public policy that will save countless women’s lives and begin to pay back a debt that Argentinian society has owed to women for far too long.    We call on the Argentinian Senate to listen to the tens of thousands of women who have courageously shared their stories and marched in the streets to demand their rights. You have the opportunity and responsibility to lead this inevitable change and ensure that all Argentines should be treated as equals.”   While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility. Women with few economic and social resources, many of whom are victims of gender-based violence, and/or live in rural areas, don’t have the ability to access care and are significantly more vulnerable than upper-class women in urban centres. Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion care is decriminalized.  IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all.    

アルゼンチンで中絶の合法化を求めてデモをする人々
news_item

| 14 June 2018

Argentina's House of Deputies approves bill decriminalizing abortion up to 14 weeks

The Argentinian House of Deputies approved a bill that decriminalizes abortion up to 14 weeks. The vote tally was 129 in favor, 125 against and 1 abstention. The bill now heads to the Argentine Senate.    Giselle Carino, IPPF Western Hemisphere Region’s Director (IPPF/WHR) and CEO, issued the following statement:  “Today, Argentina’s House of Deputies voted for women’s rights, for human rights, and for democracy. The vote paves the way for sound public policy that will save countless women’s lives and begin to pay back a debt that Argentinian society has owed to women for far too long.    We call on the Argentinian Senate to listen to the tens of thousands of women who have courageously shared their stories and marched in the streets to demand their rights. You have the opportunity and responsibility to lead this inevitable change and ensure that all Argentines should be treated as equals.”   While current law in Argentina technically permits a woman access to abortion services when her life is in danger, or when the pregnancy is the result of rape, the true issue is one of accessibility. Women with few economic and social resources, many of whom are victims of gender-based violence, and/or live in rural areas, don’t have the ability to access care and are significantly more vulnerable than upper-class women in urban centres. Poor women bear the brunt of these restrictive laws and will continue to pay with their health and lives until abortion care is decriminalized.  IPPF congratulates our partners, civil society and all the activists who fought so valiantly for women’s rights. We will continue working closely with our partners and allies in Argentina in the fight for sexual and reproductive rights for all.    

国民投票の結果を見守る市民
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| 26 May 2018

Ireland’s Yes vote is a triumph of compassion over coercion

IPPF is overjoyed at the Irish people’s decision to remove the harmful ‘8th Amendment’ from Ireland’s constitution with today’s referendum result.   IPPF’s Director General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “ We wholeheartedly welcome this vote for change, which makes it possible for the Irish Parliament to legalise abortion care on a woman’s own indication in the first trimester of pregnancy, in line with the many other countries around the world which ensure women can access safe and legal abortion care when they need it.”   Caroline Hickson, IPPF’s European Network Regional Director, said: “As an Irishwoman, I know the 8th Amendment has harmed countless women physically, emotionally and psychologically for more than 30 years. The vote to remove it paves the way for a more compassionate and caring environment for women in Ireland. They will no longer be forced to access abortion outside the state or resort to unsafe and unregulated use of abortion pills obtained online and outside the law. Instead, women and girls who experience crisis pregnancies will be able to make personal, private decisions about their health care with the support of their doctors and loved ones. They will be able to receive proper care, in their country, when they are at their most vulnerable.”   Dr Alvaro Bermejo added: “Ireland’s decision sends a signal around Europe and the world that people’s care and compassion can triumph over absolutism and coercion. We hope that it also gives courage to women and all those who support their fight against reproductive coercion in so many other places, and to all those countries where the Global Gag Rule is having a devastating impact on access to sexual and reproductive health care. For all women everywhere, it’s time to end forced full pregnancy and make abortion care safe, legal and accessible. Today Ireland has shown us that positive change is possible.”  

国民投票の結果を見守る市民
news_item

| 26 May 2018

Ireland’s Yes vote is a triumph of compassion over coercion

IPPF is overjoyed at the Irish people’s decision to remove the harmful ‘8th Amendment’ from Ireland’s constitution with today’s referendum result.   IPPF’s Director General, Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “ We wholeheartedly welcome this vote for change, which makes it possible for the Irish Parliament to legalise abortion care on a woman’s own indication in the first trimester of pregnancy, in line with the many other countries around the world which ensure women can access safe and legal abortion care when they need it.”   Caroline Hickson, IPPF’s European Network Regional Director, said: “As an Irishwoman, I know the 8th Amendment has harmed countless women physically, emotionally and psychologically for more than 30 years. The vote to remove it paves the way for a more compassionate and caring environment for women in Ireland. They will no longer be forced to access abortion outside the state or resort to unsafe and unregulated use of abortion pills obtained online and outside the law. Instead, women and girls who experience crisis pregnancies will be able to make personal, private decisions about their health care with the support of their doctors and loved ones. They will be able to receive proper care, in their country, when they are at their most vulnerable.”   Dr Alvaro Bermejo added: “Ireland’s decision sends a signal around Europe and the world that people’s care and compassion can triumph over absolutism and coercion. We hope that it also gives courage to women and all those who support their fight against reproductive coercion in so many other places, and to all those countries where the Global Gag Rule is having a devastating impact on access to sexual and reproductive health care. For all women everywhere, it’s time to end forced full pregnancy and make abortion care safe, legal and accessible. Today Ireland has shown us that positive change is possible.”