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The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) at the ACSHR

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) and Reproductive Health for Advancing Human Security and Enhancing People’s Wellbeing in Africa at The 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR)

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jens-congo
news item

| 13 September 2023

Tribute to Jens van Roey, a pioneering, inspiring doctor and HIV activist

IPPF Director General Alvaro Bermejo, former Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, reflects on the life of the pioneering, inspiring doctor, HIV activist and devoted Trustee of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, whose passion and work shaped what is now Frontline AIDS  The most extraordinary Jens van Roey will no longer be seen cycling through life. His legacy will continue and expand in so many of us who got to experience his determination to live and to make a contribution.  A medical doctor, devoted to his work in Africa, it was a phone call from his own Belgian doctor in autumn of 1988 that changed his life: he was HIV+. Not a death sentence but a call to live fully. Jens dedicated his life to breaking the silence, informing communities and researching a treatment through Tibotec -a start-up pharma that he had helped to create.  I first met him in 2003 when I was interviewing for the International HIV/AIDS Alliance job and from that day on I was proud to have found a mentor and friend. Jens walked a powerful line as an activist researcher and a person living with HIV. With UNAIDS he led the process that agreed the GIPA Principles – the Greater Involvement of people with AIDS. He was always the most community oriented member of the Board… and then he would remind you that he was actually the private sector guy working for pharma. He had been part of building it from the start and never missed a meeting; he never let the incredibly aggressive treatments that were being tested on his own body stop him from travelling and contributing. His passion, his caring, was much stronger than any of that.  He got to celebrate his 60th birthday and decided to retire while staying actively engaged with two of his babies: the Alliance and the International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM). By then IPM was working on the dapivirine ring – the female-controlled product that he had devoted his work to developing.   His other great passion was cycling the world with his wife Bieke. Together they raised money for small HIV organisations and for the projects they continued supporting in Congo.   A decade – and a few cancers - later, he celebrated his 70th birthday. Sadly it would be his last. I had the privilege of catching up with him a few weeks later. He showed me the beautiful city of Mechelen, in Belgium, and passionately explained how good, progressive leadership can have a real impact on people’s lives, and we talked about his son and daughter, and how proud he was of their work and of his grand children but more than anything, we talked about the potential of a female controlled technology, one that can prevent HIV infection and unwanted pregnancies reaching the market  He was not ready to go. But that is because he never will leave us. Our hearts and minds are with his wife Bieke, son, daughter, his grandchildren and all who loved him and were inspired by him.  Banner image of Dr. van Roey in the Democratic Republic of the Congo originally appears in this piece by Johnson & Johnson.

jens-congo
news_item

| 13 September 2023

Tribute to Jens van Roey, a pioneering, inspiring doctor and HIV activist

IPPF Director General Alvaro Bermejo, former Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, reflects on the life of the pioneering, inspiring doctor, HIV activist and devoted Trustee of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, whose passion and work shaped what is now Frontline AIDS  The most extraordinary Jens van Roey will no longer be seen cycling through life. His legacy will continue and expand in so many of us who got to experience his determination to live and to make a contribution.  A medical doctor, devoted to his work in Africa, it was a phone call from his own Belgian doctor in autumn of 1988 that changed his life: he was HIV+. Not a death sentence but a call to live fully. Jens dedicated his life to breaking the silence, informing communities and researching a treatment through Tibotec -a start-up pharma that he had helped to create.  I first met him in 2003 when I was interviewing for the International HIV/AIDS Alliance job and from that day on I was proud to have found a mentor and friend. Jens walked a powerful line as an activist researcher and a person living with HIV. With UNAIDS he led the process that agreed the GIPA Principles – the Greater Involvement of people with AIDS. He was always the most community oriented member of the Board… and then he would remind you that he was actually the private sector guy working for pharma. He had been part of building it from the start and never missed a meeting; he never let the incredibly aggressive treatments that were being tested on his own body stop him from travelling and contributing. His passion, his caring, was much stronger than any of that.  He got to celebrate his 60th birthday and decided to retire while staying actively engaged with two of his babies: the Alliance and the International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM). By then IPM was working on the dapivirine ring – the female-controlled product that he had devoted his work to developing.   His other great passion was cycling the world with his wife Bieke. Together they raised money for small HIV organisations and for the projects they continued supporting in Congo.   A decade – and a few cancers - later, he celebrated his 70th birthday. Sadly it would be his last. I had the privilege of catching up with him a few weeks later. He showed me the beautiful city of Mechelen, in Belgium, and passionately explained how good, progressive leadership can have a real impact on people’s lives, and we talked about his son and daughter, and how proud he was of their work and of his grand children but more than anything, we talked about the potential of a female controlled technology, one that can prevent HIV infection and unwanted pregnancies reaching the market  He was not ready to go. But that is because he never will leave us. Our hearts and minds are with his wife Bieke, son, daughter, his grandchildren and all who loved him and were inspired by him.  Banner image of Dr. van Roey in the Democratic Republic of the Congo originally appears in this piece by Johnson & Johnson.

japanese-mp
news item

| 17 August 2023

Japanese MP visits IPPF Member Association in Mozambique

On 16 August 2023, Japanese House of Representatives member Dr Toshiko Abe visited head office and the Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services Centre of IPPF’s Member Association in Mozambique, the Associação Moçambicana para Desenvolvimento da Família (AMODEFA). Dr Abe visited one of AMODEFA’s eight youth centres in a particularly marginalised and high poverty density area, where youth friendly health services is difficult to reach for the local youth who need them most. Their youth centre functions as the hub of youth target activities such as provision of a range of services from HIV testing and treatment to SRHR counselling and other information and services around sexual health and rights. In 2022 23.57 % of AMODEFA’s family planning services were provided to clients under 20 years. AMODEFA was established in 1989 and has been IPPF’s Full Member Association since 2010. It is an independent, non-profit, and non-governmental association working in 10 provinces in Mozambique. As the leading service provider in Mozambique, AMODEFA provides comprehensive and diverse sexual and reproductive health, including that related to SGBV. Their focus is on vulnerable people such as women, girls, people with disabilities.

japanese-mp
news_item

| 17 August 2023

Japanese MP visits IPPF Member Association in Mozambique

On 16 August 2023, Japanese House of Representatives member Dr Toshiko Abe visited head office and the Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services Centre of IPPF’s Member Association in Mozambique, the Associação Moçambicana para Desenvolvimento da Família (AMODEFA). Dr Abe visited one of AMODEFA’s eight youth centres in a particularly marginalised and high poverty density area, where youth friendly health services is difficult to reach for the local youth who need them most. Their youth centre functions as the hub of youth target activities such as provision of a range of services from HIV testing and treatment to SRHR counselling and other information and services around sexual health and rights. In 2022 23.57 % of AMODEFA’s family planning services were provided to clients under 20 years. AMODEFA was established in 1989 and has been IPPF’s Full Member Association since 2010. It is an independent, non-profit, and non-governmental association working in 10 provinces in Mozambique. As the leading service provider in Mozambique, AMODEFA provides comprehensive and diverse sexual and reproductive health, including that related to SGBV. Their focus is on vulnerable people such as women, girls, people with disabilities.

world
news item

| 11 August 2023

Australia's New International Development Policy Sets out a Clear Pathway

Australia’s new International Development Policy was launched this week with a focus on building a peaceful, stable and prosperous region. Announced as the first long term development strategy in almost a decade, it was welcomed by those in the development sector. In contrast to the former government, Australia’s Foreign Minister has committed to rebuilding their ODA budget. While this is likely to be a slow build, with no ODA/GNI targets set, the new policy sets out a clear pathway.   IPPF welcomes the policy’s approach to localisation, the strong focus on climate resilience and humanitarian action, the commitment to gender equality and LBGTQI+ rights and the ongoing support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   The new policy has a strong focus on Australia’s role as a development partner in the region. While the geographic focus remains unchanged, the approach is quite different. At the launch, Minister Wong highlighted the importance of sovereignty, where ‘each country can determine its own fate’.  In practice for DFAT, this will mean greater accountability at post, more collaborative development of country Development Partnership Plans, more frequent progress reviews and a greater emphasis on implementing learning from evaluation. It also translates to greater investment in local solutions, including funding to support partner governments, local procurement, and civil society. The announcement of a new Civil Society Partnership Fund was well received, although details are lacking.   The other underlying theme which differs dramatically from previous aid policies is climate change, recognised by the Minister as the greatest shared challenge for the region. DFAT plans to increase climate investments and better address climate risk with a target that half of bilateral and regional investments must have a climate objective by 2024-25, increasing to 80% by 2028-29. The policy also references a new humanitarian strategy, which will complement the aid policy and is due to begin consultation in September.   Inclusion is a high priority within the policy. Minister Wong highlighted the importance of a region where ‘all can thrive and reach their potential’. Three focus areas for inclusion are Gender Equality, Disability Inclusion and LGBTQI+ rights, with supporting strategies in development, due for completion by the May budget 2024. The government is reinstating the target for 80% of development investments to address gender equality and a new requirement for investment over $3m to include gender equality objectives.  While health is not a focus area within the policy, it was mentioned as part of infrastructure programming. The policy notes the vulnerability of many health systems in the region and Australia’s continued role to strengthen capacity and support prevention and response for both infectious and non- communicable diseases. There is also a commitment to expand universal health coverage and a specific mention of support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Resourcing for international development is explored in detail. Responding to the findings of the Development Finance Review and recognising the limitations of ODA funding, the policy proposes an increase in blended finance, and an investment of up to A$250m to leverage private investment.  This will be supported by a new unit in DFAT to work with philanthropy and impact investment. The policy also highlights changes to reporting and accountability within DFAT, greater transparency of results, and increased investment in DFAT development capability (36.8m announced in the May budget).   Since the integration of AusAID into DFAT in 2013, international development has been a low priority in Australia, undervalued and diminished through multiple budget cuts. The Albanese government has promised something different. While the lack of an ODA funding target is disappointing, this policy is a step in the right direction.  The recognition of shared challenges and shift towards genuine engagement highlight an understanding of the value of development work, not just for beneficiaries but for the region as a whole. Together with DFAT’s investment in development capability and shift to a whole of government approach and Minister Wong’s outspoken commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development there are strong indications that Australia is taking development seriously.   As recipients and partners of the Australian International Development program, IPPF look forward to supporting the roll out of the new Australian International Development Policy, consulting on the strategies and participating in the design of new programs. We hope to see the collaboration continue and the funding match the ambition.   IPPF works closely with the Australian government and is funded through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to integrate sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) into humanitarian preparedness response and recovery through SPRINT; to restore services, particularly to marginalized populations impacted by COVID-19 through RESPOND and to support the ambitious Pacific Niu Vaka Strategy Phase 2, enabling quality SRHR to be realised for everyone in the Pacific.  To read the full policy, click here.  Cover illustration by Edinah Chewe for The Greats.

world
news_item

| 11 August 2023

Australia's New International Development Policy Sets out a Clear Pathway

Australia’s new International Development Policy was launched this week with a focus on building a peaceful, stable and prosperous region. Announced as the first long term development strategy in almost a decade, it was welcomed by those in the development sector. In contrast to the former government, Australia’s Foreign Minister has committed to rebuilding their ODA budget. While this is likely to be a slow build, with no ODA/GNI targets set, the new policy sets out a clear pathway.   IPPF welcomes the policy’s approach to localisation, the strong focus on climate resilience and humanitarian action, the commitment to gender equality and LBGTQI+ rights and the ongoing support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   The new policy has a strong focus on Australia’s role as a development partner in the region. While the geographic focus remains unchanged, the approach is quite different. At the launch, Minister Wong highlighted the importance of sovereignty, where ‘each country can determine its own fate’.  In practice for DFAT, this will mean greater accountability at post, more collaborative development of country Development Partnership Plans, more frequent progress reviews and a greater emphasis on implementing learning from evaluation. It also translates to greater investment in local solutions, including funding to support partner governments, local procurement, and civil society. The announcement of a new Civil Society Partnership Fund was well received, although details are lacking.   The other underlying theme which differs dramatically from previous aid policies is climate change, recognised by the Minister as the greatest shared challenge for the region. DFAT plans to increase climate investments and better address climate risk with a target that half of bilateral and regional investments must have a climate objective by 2024-25, increasing to 80% by 2028-29. The policy also references a new humanitarian strategy, which will complement the aid policy and is due to begin consultation in September.   Inclusion is a high priority within the policy. Minister Wong highlighted the importance of a region where ‘all can thrive and reach their potential’. Three focus areas for inclusion are Gender Equality, Disability Inclusion and LGBTQI+ rights, with supporting strategies in development, due for completion by the May budget 2024. The government is reinstating the target for 80% of development investments to address gender equality and a new requirement for investment over $3m to include gender equality objectives.  While health is not a focus area within the policy, it was mentioned as part of infrastructure programming. The policy notes the vulnerability of many health systems in the region and Australia’s continued role to strengthen capacity and support prevention and response for both infectious and non- communicable diseases. There is also a commitment to expand universal health coverage and a specific mention of support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Resourcing for international development is explored in detail. Responding to the findings of the Development Finance Review and recognising the limitations of ODA funding, the policy proposes an increase in blended finance, and an investment of up to A$250m to leverage private investment.  This will be supported by a new unit in DFAT to work with philanthropy and impact investment. The policy also highlights changes to reporting and accountability within DFAT, greater transparency of results, and increased investment in DFAT development capability (36.8m announced in the May budget).   Since the integration of AusAID into DFAT in 2013, international development has been a low priority in Australia, undervalued and diminished through multiple budget cuts. The Albanese government has promised something different. While the lack of an ODA funding target is disappointing, this policy is a step in the right direction.  The recognition of shared challenges and shift towards genuine engagement highlight an understanding of the value of development work, not just for beneficiaries but for the region as a whole. Together with DFAT’s investment in development capability and shift to a whole of government approach and Minister Wong’s outspoken commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development there are strong indications that Australia is taking development seriously.   As recipients and partners of the Australian International Development program, IPPF look forward to supporting the roll out of the new Australian International Development Policy, consulting on the strategies and participating in the design of new programs. We hope to see the collaboration continue and the funding match the ambition.   IPPF works closely with the Australian government and is funded through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to integrate sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) into humanitarian preparedness response and recovery through SPRINT; to restore services, particularly to marginalized populations impacted by COVID-19 through RESPOND and to support the ambitious Pacific Niu Vaka Strategy Phase 2, enabling quality SRHR to be realised for everyone in the Pacific.  To read the full policy, click here.  Cover illustration by Edinah Chewe for The Greats.

kigali-cta
news item

| 18 July 2023

Kigali Call to Action: United for Women and Girls' Bodily Autonomy

The world is not on track to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5 (SDG5) by 2023. Instead we are witnessing a global pushback on women's rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. The global pushback, driven by a well-coordinated transnational anti-gender movement is placing the hard-fought gains on gender equality and women’s rights, including reproductive rights, under threat. This global pushback is hampering negotiations in intergovernmental spaces. Additionally, declining investments, regressive laws, rising conservatism, harmful technology, and climate change, are factors further compounding the gender equality and reproductive health and rights crisis. According to recent data from 68 countries reporting on SDG indicator 5.6.1, 44 per cent of partnered women worldwide still cannot make their own choices about their reproductive health, use of contraception, and ability to say no to sex. Violations and limitations of women and girls’ bodily autonomy ranges from a lack of choice which can lead to unintended pregnancies, to laws that restrict women and girls’ ability to exercise their reproductive rights, and abortion being criminalized or not accessible despite being legal. These constraints also threaten access to comprehensive sexuality education, and hamper efforts to end gender based violence including increasing forms like technology-facilitated gender based violence, and harmful practices. Sexual and reproductive health and rights, including the rights to be free from violence and harmful practices are human rights and they are not negotiable. They ought to be upheld for women and girls in all their diversity everywhere - and should never be rolled back anywhere. Bodily autonomy, “the right to govern over one's own body” is the foundation of gender equality and societies flourish when women and girls can exercise their bodily autonomy. Therefore, We, the signatories of this Call to Action are: Reaffirming the ICPD Programme of Action, Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other international agreements that give credence to the right to bodily autonomy, Reiterating the Beijing Declaration, which recognized that “the right of all women to control all aspects of their health, in particular their own fertility, is basic to their empowerment”, Recalling the Nairobi Statement on ICPD25, which called for the protection of the right to bodily integrity and autonomy, Championing the momentum of the Generation Equality Forum, building on the achievements of the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women, through global multi-stakeholder partnerships to reach gender equality by 2030, and reiterating our commitments to the blueprints of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, reflected in the Global Acceleration Plan for Gender Equality as well as the Young Feminist Manifesto, Recognizing the complexity of the challenges before us with gender inequality being perpetuated by multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, deeply rooted social and gender norms, gender unequal structures as well as misconceptions about the rights of women and girls, Acknowledging that gender inequality, perpetuated by gender unequal structures, norms and attitudes, remains one of the most pervasive impediments to bodily autonomy, Expressing deep concern about the global pushback and backtracking of the hard fought gains and the shrinking civic space for the women's movements to operate, especially since the presence of an autonomous feminist movement is a critical factor to drive policy change, Reminding that exercising bodily autonomy means access to free and informed choice, unhindered by demographic, economic, social, political, environmental or security barriers, as articulated in the State of the World Population Report 2023 “8 Billion Lives, Infinite Possibilities: The Case for Rights and Choices”, Celebrating the examples of progress witnessed globally, offering a glimpse of hope, in terms of progressive legislation on reproductive rights, and the significant contributions made by civil society, including women-led organizations, the girls and women´s feminist movement, and networks fighting for bodily autonomy from local to global levels. We call on all stakeholders to: ● Leverage the momentum of the ICPD30 Review to reaffirm, recommit and expand the range of stakeholders globally in support of all women and girls´ bodily autonomy, ● Harness and accelerate collective actions and partnerships towards the implementation of the blueprint of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, as well as synergies across all Action Coalitions, ● Expand efforts to ensure all women and girls have the power of choice and decision-making to realize bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights, and live free of genderbased violence and harmful practices — as essentials for achieving the SDGs and a sustainable future, ● Innovate and identify approaches, particularly to support, finance and engage women-led organizations, the feminist movement, including young feminists, to engage in collective action towards a stronger movement for bodily autonomy, leveraging the potential of the ICPD mandate, ● Increase international financing for the accelerated implementation of the ICPD Programme of Action, to complement and catalyze domestic financing, in particular of sexual and reproductive health programmes, and other supportive measures and interventions that promote gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment, ● Invest in and strengthen evidence informed and rights based policies and programmes in support of all women and girls’ bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Cover illustration by Daniela Yankova for The Greats

kigali-cta
news_item

| 18 July 2023

Kigali Call to Action: United for Women and Girls' Bodily Autonomy

The world is not on track to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5 (SDG5) by 2023. Instead we are witnessing a global pushback on women's rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. The global pushback, driven by a well-coordinated transnational anti-gender movement is placing the hard-fought gains on gender equality and women’s rights, including reproductive rights, under threat. This global pushback is hampering negotiations in intergovernmental spaces. Additionally, declining investments, regressive laws, rising conservatism, harmful technology, and climate change, are factors further compounding the gender equality and reproductive health and rights crisis. According to recent data from 68 countries reporting on SDG indicator 5.6.1, 44 per cent of partnered women worldwide still cannot make their own choices about their reproductive health, use of contraception, and ability to say no to sex. Violations and limitations of women and girls’ bodily autonomy ranges from a lack of choice which can lead to unintended pregnancies, to laws that restrict women and girls’ ability to exercise their reproductive rights, and abortion being criminalized or not accessible despite being legal. These constraints also threaten access to comprehensive sexuality education, and hamper efforts to end gender based violence including increasing forms like technology-facilitated gender based violence, and harmful practices. Sexual and reproductive health and rights, including the rights to be free from violence and harmful practices are human rights and they are not negotiable. They ought to be upheld for women and girls in all their diversity everywhere - and should never be rolled back anywhere. Bodily autonomy, “the right to govern over one's own body” is the foundation of gender equality and societies flourish when women and girls can exercise their bodily autonomy. Therefore, We, the signatories of this Call to Action are: Reaffirming the ICPD Programme of Action, Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other international agreements that give credence to the right to bodily autonomy, Reiterating the Beijing Declaration, which recognized that “the right of all women to control all aspects of their health, in particular their own fertility, is basic to their empowerment”, Recalling the Nairobi Statement on ICPD25, which called for the protection of the right to bodily integrity and autonomy, Championing the momentum of the Generation Equality Forum, building on the achievements of the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women, through global multi-stakeholder partnerships to reach gender equality by 2030, and reiterating our commitments to the blueprints of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, reflected in the Global Acceleration Plan for Gender Equality as well as the Young Feminist Manifesto, Recognizing the complexity of the challenges before us with gender inequality being perpetuated by multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, deeply rooted social and gender norms, gender unequal structures as well as misconceptions about the rights of women and girls, Acknowledging that gender inequality, perpetuated by gender unequal structures, norms and attitudes, remains one of the most pervasive impediments to bodily autonomy, Expressing deep concern about the global pushback and backtracking of the hard fought gains and the shrinking civic space for the women's movements to operate, especially since the presence of an autonomous feminist movement is a critical factor to drive policy change, Reminding that exercising bodily autonomy means access to free and informed choice, unhindered by demographic, economic, social, political, environmental or security barriers, as articulated in the State of the World Population Report 2023 “8 Billion Lives, Infinite Possibilities: The Case for Rights and Choices”, Celebrating the examples of progress witnessed globally, offering a glimpse of hope, in terms of progressive legislation on reproductive rights, and the significant contributions made by civil society, including women-led organizations, the girls and women´s feminist movement, and networks fighting for bodily autonomy from local to global levels. We call on all stakeholders to: ● Leverage the momentum of the ICPD30 Review to reaffirm, recommit and expand the range of stakeholders globally in support of all women and girls´ bodily autonomy, ● Harness and accelerate collective actions and partnerships towards the implementation of the blueprint of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, as well as synergies across all Action Coalitions, ● Expand efforts to ensure all women and girls have the power of choice and decision-making to realize bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights, and live free of genderbased violence and harmful practices — as essentials for achieving the SDGs and a sustainable future, ● Innovate and identify approaches, particularly to support, finance and engage women-led organizations, the feminist movement, including young feminists, to engage in collective action towards a stronger movement for bodily autonomy, leveraging the potential of the ICPD mandate, ● Increase international financing for the accelerated implementation of the ICPD Programme of Action, to complement and catalyze domestic financing, in particular of sexual and reproductive health programmes, and other supportive measures and interventions that promote gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment, ● Invest in and strengthen evidence informed and rights based policies and programmes in support of all women and girls’ bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Cover illustration by Daniela Yankova for The Greats

ippf-women-deliver
news item

| 13 July 2023

IPPF at Women Deliver 2023

IPPF is a proud participant of Women Deliver 2023. IPPF will be involved in a series of panel discussions, virtual sessions and events concerning accountability, bodily autonomy, global abortion rights, gender equality, comprehensive sexuality education and reproductive justice. See below a schedule of our in-person and virtual activities. For more information and to register for the conference, click here.    Sunday 16th July Pre-conference: Catalyzing global action to end female genital mutilation or cutting Co-organized by Orchid Project, ARROW, The Global Platform to End FGM/C, End FGM European Network, Sahiyo, Equality Now, Amref Health Africa, The Girl Generation, IPPF ARAB World Region, U.S. End FGM/C Network, and End FGM Canada Network Time: 8:30-17:30 Location: Simba Ballroom, Four Points Sheraton    Tuesday 18th July Virtual session: Reforming legal frameworks for sex work to strengthen access to SRHR and the fight against GBV against sex workers Co-organized by Médecins du Monde, IPPF, ESWA, Nikat Charitable Association and NSWP Time: 10:45-12:00 Location: Virtual   Wednesday 19th July Side event: Beyond Marriage & Motherhood: The forgotten girl brides of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Co-hosted by the Australian government, IPPF, MSI, Burnet, UNICEF & UNFPA Time: 7:00-8:30 Location: Kigali Conference Centre, Theatre Side event: Igniting intergenerational power: Advancing Health and Gender Equality for Women of All Ages Co-organized by HelpAge Int, WHO, Equality Now & IPPFAR Time: 15.45-17:00 Location: Solidarity Space within the Kigali Conference Centre   Thursday 20th July Concurrent session: Breaking the Binary: Strengthening sexual and gender minority inclusion in SRH Co-organized by IPPF, USAID, Agency for All, Breakthrough Action & HDI Rwanda Time: 9:30-11:00 Location: Room MH3.2, Kigali Conference Center Virtual session: Reframing the MISP: SRH for all in crisis situations Co-organized by IPPF & YouAct (The European Youth Network on Sexual and Reproductive Rights) Time:12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual Virtual session: Silence on Infertility: Catalyzing rights-based pathways for fertility care Co-organized by IPPF & ShareNet Time: 12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual   For more information and to register for Women Deliver 2023, click here. 

ippf-women-deliver
news_item

| 13 July 2023

IPPF at Women Deliver 2023

IPPF is a proud participant of Women Deliver 2023. IPPF will be involved in a series of panel discussions, virtual sessions and events concerning accountability, bodily autonomy, global abortion rights, gender equality, comprehensive sexuality education and reproductive justice. See below a schedule of our in-person and virtual activities. For more information and to register for the conference, click here.    Sunday 16th July Pre-conference: Catalyzing global action to end female genital mutilation or cutting Co-organized by Orchid Project, ARROW, The Global Platform to End FGM/C, End FGM European Network, Sahiyo, Equality Now, Amref Health Africa, The Girl Generation, IPPF ARAB World Region, U.S. End FGM/C Network, and End FGM Canada Network Time: 8:30-17:30 Location: Simba Ballroom, Four Points Sheraton    Tuesday 18th July Virtual session: Reforming legal frameworks for sex work to strengthen access to SRHR and the fight against GBV against sex workers Co-organized by Médecins du Monde, IPPF, ESWA, Nikat Charitable Association and NSWP Time: 10:45-12:00 Location: Virtual   Wednesday 19th July Side event: Beyond Marriage & Motherhood: The forgotten girl brides of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Co-hosted by the Australian government, IPPF, MSI, Burnet, UNICEF & UNFPA Time: 7:00-8:30 Location: Kigali Conference Centre, Theatre Side event: Igniting intergenerational power: Advancing Health and Gender Equality for Women of All Ages Co-organized by HelpAge Int, WHO, Equality Now & IPPFAR Time: 15.45-17:00 Location: Solidarity Space within the Kigali Conference Centre   Thursday 20th July Concurrent session: Breaking the Binary: Strengthening sexual and gender minority inclusion in SRH Co-organized by IPPF, USAID, Agency for All, Breakthrough Action & HDI Rwanda Time: 9:30-11:00 Location: Room MH3.2, Kigali Conference Center Virtual session: Reframing the MISP: SRH for all in crisis situations Co-organized by IPPF & YouAct (The European Youth Network on Sexual and Reproductive Rights) Time:12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual Virtual session: Silence on Infertility: Catalyzing rights-based pathways for fertility care Co-organized by IPPF & ShareNet Time: 12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual   For more information and to register for Women Deliver 2023, click here. 

Change Makers Wanted:
news item

| 18 April 2023

Change Makers Wanted:

Links to all IPPF Secretariat vacancies below.  Download Strategy (2023-2028) Opportunities by Geography:   Learn More About IPPF 

Change Makers Wanted:
news_item

| 25 April 2023

Change Makers Wanted:

Links to all IPPF Secretariat vacancies below.  Download Strategy (2023-2028) Opportunities by Geography:   Learn More About IPPF 

jens-congo
news item

| 13 September 2023

Tribute to Jens van Roey, a pioneering, inspiring doctor and HIV activist

IPPF Director General Alvaro Bermejo, former Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, reflects on the life of the pioneering, inspiring doctor, HIV activist and devoted Trustee of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, whose passion and work shaped what is now Frontline AIDS  The most extraordinary Jens van Roey will no longer be seen cycling through life. His legacy will continue and expand in so many of us who got to experience his determination to live and to make a contribution.  A medical doctor, devoted to his work in Africa, it was a phone call from his own Belgian doctor in autumn of 1988 that changed his life: he was HIV+. Not a death sentence but a call to live fully. Jens dedicated his life to breaking the silence, informing communities and researching a treatment through Tibotec -a start-up pharma that he had helped to create.  I first met him in 2003 when I was interviewing for the International HIV/AIDS Alliance job and from that day on I was proud to have found a mentor and friend. Jens walked a powerful line as an activist researcher and a person living with HIV. With UNAIDS he led the process that agreed the GIPA Principles – the Greater Involvement of people with AIDS. He was always the most community oriented member of the Board… and then he would remind you that he was actually the private sector guy working for pharma. He had been part of building it from the start and never missed a meeting; he never let the incredibly aggressive treatments that were being tested on his own body stop him from travelling and contributing. His passion, his caring, was much stronger than any of that.  He got to celebrate his 60th birthday and decided to retire while staying actively engaged with two of his babies: the Alliance and the International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM). By then IPM was working on the dapivirine ring – the female-controlled product that he had devoted his work to developing.   His other great passion was cycling the world with his wife Bieke. Together they raised money for small HIV organisations and for the projects they continued supporting in Congo.   A decade – and a few cancers - later, he celebrated his 70th birthday. Sadly it would be his last. I had the privilege of catching up with him a few weeks later. He showed me the beautiful city of Mechelen, in Belgium, and passionately explained how good, progressive leadership can have a real impact on people’s lives, and we talked about his son and daughter, and how proud he was of their work and of his grand children but more than anything, we talked about the potential of a female controlled technology, one that can prevent HIV infection and unwanted pregnancies reaching the market  He was not ready to go. But that is because he never will leave us. Our hearts and minds are with his wife Bieke, son, daughter, his grandchildren and all who loved him and were inspired by him.  Banner image of Dr. van Roey in the Democratic Republic of the Congo originally appears in this piece by Johnson & Johnson.

jens-congo
news_item

| 13 September 2023

Tribute to Jens van Roey, a pioneering, inspiring doctor and HIV activist

IPPF Director General Alvaro Bermejo, former Executive Director of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, reflects on the life of the pioneering, inspiring doctor, HIV activist and devoted Trustee of the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, whose passion and work shaped what is now Frontline AIDS  The most extraordinary Jens van Roey will no longer be seen cycling through life. His legacy will continue and expand in so many of us who got to experience his determination to live and to make a contribution.  A medical doctor, devoted to his work in Africa, it was a phone call from his own Belgian doctor in autumn of 1988 that changed his life: he was HIV+. Not a death sentence but a call to live fully. Jens dedicated his life to breaking the silence, informing communities and researching a treatment through Tibotec -a start-up pharma that he had helped to create.  I first met him in 2003 when I was interviewing for the International HIV/AIDS Alliance job and from that day on I was proud to have found a mentor and friend. Jens walked a powerful line as an activist researcher and a person living with HIV. With UNAIDS he led the process that agreed the GIPA Principles – the Greater Involvement of people with AIDS. He was always the most community oriented member of the Board… and then he would remind you that he was actually the private sector guy working for pharma. He had been part of building it from the start and never missed a meeting; he never let the incredibly aggressive treatments that were being tested on his own body stop him from travelling and contributing. His passion, his caring, was much stronger than any of that.  He got to celebrate his 60th birthday and decided to retire while staying actively engaged with two of his babies: the Alliance and the International Partnership for Microbicides (IPM). By then IPM was working on the dapivirine ring – the female-controlled product that he had devoted his work to developing.   His other great passion was cycling the world with his wife Bieke. Together they raised money for small HIV organisations and for the projects they continued supporting in Congo.   A decade – and a few cancers - later, he celebrated his 70th birthday. Sadly it would be his last. I had the privilege of catching up with him a few weeks later. He showed me the beautiful city of Mechelen, in Belgium, and passionately explained how good, progressive leadership can have a real impact on people’s lives, and we talked about his son and daughter, and how proud he was of their work and of his grand children but more than anything, we talked about the potential of a female controlled technology, one that can prevent HIV infection and unwanted pregnancies reaching the market  He was not ready to go. But that is because he never will leave us. Our hearts and minds are with his wife Bieke, son, daughter, his grandchildren and all who loved him and were inspired by him.  Banner image of Dr. van Roey in the Democratic Republic of the Congo originally appears in this piece by Johnson & Johnson.

japanese-mp
news item

| 17 August 2023

Japanese MP visits IPPF Member Association in Mozambique

On 16 August 2023, Japanese House of Representatives member Dr Toshiko Abe visited head office and the Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services Centre of IPPF’s Member Association in Mozambique, the Associação Moçambicana para Desenvolvimento da Família (AMODEFA). Dr Abe visited one of AMODEFA’s eight youth centres in a particularly marginalised and high poverty density area, where youth friendly health services is difficult to reach for the local youth who need them most. Their youth centre functions as the hub of youth target activities such as provision of a range of services from HIV testing and treatment to SRHR counselling and other information and services around sexual health and rights. In 2022 23.57 % of AMODEFA’s family planning services were provided to clients under 20 years. AMODEFA was established in 1989 and has been IPPF’s Full Member Association since 2010. It is an independent, non-profit, and non-governmental association working in 10 provinces in Mozambique. As the leading service provider in Mozambique, AMODEFA provides comprehensive and diverse sexual and reproductive health, including that related to SGBV. Their focus is on vulnerable people such as women, girls, people with disabilities.

japanese-mp
news_item

| 17 August 2023

Japanese MP visits IPPF Member Association in Mozambique

On 16 August 2023, Japanese House of Representatives member Dr Toshiko Abe visited head office and the Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services Centre of IPPF’s Member Association in Mozambique, the Associação Moçambicana para Desenvolvimento da Família (AMODEFA). Dr Abe visited one of AMODEFA’s eight youth centres in a particularly marginalised and high poverty density area, where youth friendly health services is difficult to reach for the local youth who need them most. Their youth centre functions as the hub of youth target activities such as provision of a range of services from HIV testing and treatment to SRHR counselling and other information and services around sexual health and rights. In 2022 23.57 % of AMODEFA’s family planning services were provided to clients under 20 years. AMODEFA was established in 1989 and has been IPPF’s Full Member Association since 2010. It is an independent, non-profit, and non-governmental association working in 10 provinces in Mozambique. As the leading service provider in Mozambique, AMODEFA provides comprehensive and diverse sexual and reproductive health, including that related to SGBV. Their focus is on vulnerable people such as women, girls, people with disabilities.

world
news item

| 11 August 2023

Australia's New International Development Policy Sets out a Clear Pathway

Australia’s new International Development Policy was launched this week with a focus on building a peaceful, stable and prosperous region. Announced as the first long term development strategy in almost a decade, it was welcomed by those in the development sector. In contrast to the former government, Australia’s Foreign Minister has committed to rebuilding their ODA budget. While this is likely to be a slow build, with no ODA/GNI targets set, the new policy sets out a clear pathway.   IPPF welcomes the policy’s approach to localisation, the strong focus on climate resilience and humanitarian action, the commitment to gender equality and LBGTQI+ rights and the ongoing support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   The new policy has a strong focus on Australia’s role as a development partner in the region. While the geographic focus remains unchanged, the approach is quite different. At the launch, Minister Wong highlighted the importance of sovereignty, where ‘each country can determine its own fate’.  In practice for DFAT, this will mean greater accountability at post, more collaborative development of country Development Partnership Plans, more frequent progress reviews and a greater emphasis on implementing learning from evaluation. It also translates to greater investment in local solutions, including funding to support partner governments, local procurement, and civil society. The announcement of a new Civil Society Partnership Fund was well received, although details are lacking.   The other underlying theme which differs dramatically from previous aid policies is climate change, recognised by the Minister as the greatest shared challenge for the region. DFAT plans to increase climate investments and better address climate risk with a target that half of bilateral and regional investments must have a climate objective by 2024-25, increasing to 80% by 2028-29. The policy also references a new humanitarian strategy, which will complement the aid policy and is due to begin consultation in September.   Inclusion is a high priority within the policy. Minister Wong highlighted the importance of a region where ‘all can thrive and reach their potential’. Three focus areas for inclusion are Gender Equality, Disability Inclusion and LGBTQI+ rights, with supporting strategies in development, due for completion by the May budget 2024. The government is reinstating the target for 80% of development investments to address gender equality and a new requirement for investment over $3m to include gender equality objectives.  While health is not a focus area within the policy, it was mentioned as part of infrastructure programming. The policy notes the vulnerability of many health systems in the region and Australia’s continued role to strengthen capacity and support prevention and response for both infectious and non- communicable diseases. There is also a commitment to expand universal health coverage and a specific mention of support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Resourcing for international development is explored in detail. Responding to the findings of the Development Finance Review and recognising the limitations of ODA funding, the policy proposes an increase in blended finance, and an investment of up to A$250m to leverage private investment.  This will be supported by a new unit in DFAT to work with philanthropy and impact investment. The policy also highlights changes to reporting and accountability within DFAT, greater transparency of results, and increased investment in DFAT development capability (36.8m announced in the May budget).   Since the integration of AusAID into DFAT in 2013, international development has been a low priority in Australia, undervalued and diminished through multiple budget cuts. The Albanese government has promised something different. While the lack of an ODA funding target is disappointing, this policy is a step in the right direction.  The recognition of shared challenges and shift towards genuine engagement highlight an understanding of the value of development work, not just for beneficiaries but for the region as a whole. Together with DFAT’s investment in development capability and shift to a whole of government approach and Minister Wong’s outspoken commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development there are strong indications that Australia is taking development seriously.   As recipients and partners of the Australian International Development program, IPPF look forward to supporting the roll out of the new Australian International Development Policy, consulting on the strategies and participating in the design of new programs. We hope to see the collaboration continue and the funding match the ambition.   IPPF works closely with the Australian government and is funded through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to integrate sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) into humanitarian preparedness response and recovery through SPRINT; to restore services, particularly to marginalized populations impacted by COVID-19 through RESPOND and to support the ambitious Pacific Niu Vaka Strategy Phase 2, enabling quality SRHR to be realised for everyone in the Pacific.  To read the full policy, click here.  Cover illustration by Edinah Chewe for The Greats.

world
news_item

| 11 August 2023

Australia's New International Development Policy Sets out a Clear Pathway

Australia’s new International Development Policy was launched this week with a focus on building a peaceful, stable and prosperous region. Announced as the first long term development strategy in almost a decade, it was welcomed by those in the development sector. In contrast to the former government, Australia’s Foreign Minister has committed to rebuilding their ODA budget. While this is likely to be a slow build, with no ODA/GNI targets set, the new policy sets out a clear pathway.   IPPF welcomes the policy’s approach to localisation, the strong focus on climate resilience and humanitarian action, the commitment to gender equality and LBGTQI+ rights and the ongoing support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   The new policy has a strong focus on Australia’s role as a development partner in the region. While the geographic focus remains unchanged, the approach is quite different. At the launch, Minister Wong highlighted the importance of sovereignty, where ‘each country can determine its own fate’.  In practice for DFAT, this will mean greater accountability at post, more collaborative development of country Development Partnership Plans, more frequent progress reviews and a greater emphasis on implementing learning from evaluation. It also translates to greater investment in local solutions, including funding to support partner governments, local procurement, and civil society. The announcement of a new Civil Society Partnership Fund was well received, although details are lacking.   The other underlying theme which differs dramatically from previous aid policies is climate change, recognised by the Minister as the greatest shared challenge for the region. DFAT plans to increase climate investments and better address climate risk with a target that half of bilateral and regional investments must have a climate objective by 2024-25, increasing to 80% by 2028-29. The policy also references a new humanitarian strategy, which will complement the aid policy and is due to begin consultation in September.   Inclusion is a high priority within the policy. Minister Wong highlighted the importance of a region where ‘all can thrive and reach their potential’. Three focus areas for inclusion are Gender Equality, Disability Inclusion and LGBTQI+ rights, with supporting strategies in development, due for completion by the May budget 2024. The government is reinstating the target for 80% of development investments to address gender equality and a new requirement for investment over $3m to include gender equality objectives.  While health is not a focus area within the policy, it was mentioned as part of infrastructure programming. The policy notes the vulnerability of many health systems in the region and Australia’s continued role to strengthen capacity and support prevention and response for both infectious and non- communicable diseases. There is also a commitment to expand universal health coverage and a specific mention of support for sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Resourcing for international development is explored in detail. Responding to the findings of the Development Finance Review and recognising the limitations of ODA funding, the policy proposes an increase in blended finance, and an investment of up to A$250m to leverage private investment.  This will be supported by a new unit in DFAT to work with philanthropy and impact investment. The policy also highlights changes to reporting and accountability within DFAT, greater transparency of results, and increased investment in DFAT development capability (36.8m announced in the May budget).   Since the integration of AusAID into DFAT in 2013, international development has been a low priority in Australia, undervalued and diminished through multiple budget cuts. The Albanese government has promised something different. While the lack of an ODA funding target is disappointing, this policy is a step in the right direction.  The recognition of shared challenges and shift towards genuine engagement highlight an understanding of the value of development work, not just for beneficiaries but for the region as a whole. Together with DFAT’s investment in development capability and shift to a whole of government approach and Minister Wong’s outspoken commitment to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development there are strong indications that Australia is taking development seriously.   As recipients and partners of the Australian International Development program, IPPF look forward to supporting the roll out of the new Australian International Development Policy, consulting on the strategies and participating in the design of new programs. We hope to see the collaboration continue and the funding match the ambition.   IPPF works closely with the Australian government and is funded through the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to integrate sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) into humanitarian preparedness response and recovery through SPRINT; to restore services, particularly to marginalized populations impacted by COVID-19 through RESPOND and to support the ambitious Pacific Niu Vaka Strategy Phase 2, enabling quality SRHR to be realised for everyone in the Pacific.  To read the full policy, click here.  Cover illustration by Edinah Chewe for The Greats.

kigali-cta
news item

| 18 July 2023

Kigali Call to Action: United for Women and Girls' Bodily Autonomy

The world is not on track to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5 (SDG5) by 2023. Instead we are witnessing a global pushback on women's rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. The global pushback, driven by a well-coordinated transnational anti-gender movement is placing the hard-fought gains on gender equality and women’s rights, including reproductive rights, under threat. This global pushback is hampering negotiations in intergovernmental spaces. Additionally, declining investments, regressive laws, rising conservatism, harmful technology, and climate change, are factors further compounding the gender equality and reproductive health and rights crisis. According to recent data from 68 countries reporting on SDG indicator 5.6.1, 44 per cent of partnered women worldwide still cannot make their own choices about their reproductive health, use of contraception, and ability to say no to sex. Violations and limitations of women and girls’ bodily autonomy ranges from a lack of choice which can lead to unintended pregnancies, to laws that restrict women and girls’ ability to exercise their reproductive rights, and abortion being criminalized or not accessible despite being legal. These constraints also threaten access to comprehensive sexuality education, and hamper efforts to end gender based violence including increasing forms like technology-facilitated gender based violence, and harmful practices. Sexual and reproductive health and rights, including the rights to be free from violence and harmful practices are human rights and they are not negotiable. They ought to be upheld for women and girls in all their diversity everywhere - and should never be rolled back anywhere. Bodily autonomy, “the right to govern over one's own body” is the foundation of gender equality and societies flourish when women and girls can exercise their bodily autonomy. Therefore, We, the signatories of this Call to Action are: Reaffirming the ICPD Programme of Action, Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other international agreements that give credence to the right to bodily autonomy, Reiterating the Beijing Declaration, which recognized that “the right of all women to control all aspects of their health, in particular their own fertility, is basic to their empowerment”, Recalling the Nairobi Statement on ICPD25, which called for the protection of the right to bodily integrity and autonomy, Championing the momentum of the Generation Equality Forum, building on the achievements of the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women, through global multi-stakeholder partnerships to reach gender equality by 2030, and reiterating our commitments to the blueprints of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, reflected in the Global Acceleration Plan for Gender Equality as well as the Young Feminist Manifesto, Recognizing the complexity of the challenges before us with gender inequality being perpetuated by multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, deeply rooted social and gender norms, gender unequal structures as well as misconceptions about the rights of women and girls, Acknowledging that gender inequality, perpetuated by gender unequal structures, norms and attitudes, remains one of the most pervasive impediments to bodily autonomy, Expressing deep concern about the global pushback and backtracking of the hard fought gains and the shrinking civic space for the women's movements to operate, especially since the presence of an autonomous feminist movement is a critical factor to drive policy change, Reminding that exercising bodily autonomy means access to free and informed choice, unhindered by demographic, economic, social, political, environmental or security barriers, as articulated in the State of the World Population Report 2023 “8 Billion Lives, Infinite Possibilities: The Case for Rights and Choices”, Celebrating the examples of progress witnessed globally, offering a glimpse of hope, in terms of progressive legislation on reproductive rights, and the significant contributions made by civil society, including women-led organizations, the girls and women´s feminist movement, and networks fighting for bodily autonomy from local to global levels. We call on all stakeholders to: ● Leverage the momentum of the ICPD30 Review to reaffirm, recommit and expand the range of stakeholders globally in support of all women and girls´ bodily autonomy, ● Harness and accelerate collective actions and partnerships towards the implementation of the blueprint of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, as well as synergies across all Action Coalitions, ● Expand efforts to ensure all women and girls have the power of choice and decision-making to realize bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights, and live free of genderbased violence and harmful practices — as essentials for achieving the SDGs and a sustainable future, ● Innovate and identify approaches, particularly to support, finance and engage women-led organizations, the feminist movement, including young feminists, to engage in collective action towards a stronger movement for bodily autonomy, leveraging the potential of the ICPD mandate, ● Increase international financing for the accelerated implementation of the ICPD Programme of Action, to complement and catalyze domestic financing, in particular of sexual and reproductive health programmes, and other supportive measures and interventions that promote gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment, ● Invest in and strengthen evidence informed and rights based policies and programmes in support of all women and girls’ bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Cover illustration by Daniela Yankova for The Greats

kigali-cta
news_item

| 18 July 2023

Kigali Call to Action: United for Women and Girls' Bodily Autonomy

The world is not on track to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 5 (SDG5) by 2023. Instead we are witnessing a global pushback on women's rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and gender equality. The global pushback, driven by a well-coordinated transnational anti-gender movement is placing the hard-fought gains on gender equality and women’s rights, including reproductive rights, under threat. This global pushback is hampering negotiations in intergovernmental spaces. Additionally, declining investments, regressive laws, rising conservatism, harmful technology, and climate change, are factors further compounding the gender equality and reproductive health and rights crisis. According to recent data from 68 countries reporting on SDG indicator 5.6.1, 44 per cent of partnered women worldwide still cannot make their own choices about their reproductive health, use of contraception, and ability to say no to sex. Violations and limitations of women and girls’ bodily autonomy ranges from a lack of choice which can lead to unintended pregnancies, to laws that restrict women and girls’ ability to exercise their reproductive rights, and abortion being criminalized or not accessible despite being legal. These constraints also threaten access to comprehensive sexuality education, and hamper efforts to end gender based violence including increasing forms like technology-facilitated gender based violence, and harmful practices. Sexual and reproductive health and rights, including the rights to be free from violence and harmful practices are human rights and they are not negotiable. They ought to be upheld for women and girls in all their diversity everywhere - and should never be rolled back anywhere. Bodily autonomy, “the right to govern over one's own body” is the foundation of gender equality and societies flourish when women and girls can exercise their bodily autonomy. Therefore, We, the signatories of this Call to Action are: Reaffirming the ICPD Programme of Action, Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and other international agreements that give credence to the right to bodily autonomy, Reiterating the Beijing Declaration, which recognized that “the right of all women to control all aspects of their health, in particular their own fertility, is basic to their empowerment”, Recalling the Nairobi Statement on ICPD25, which called for the protection of the right to bodily integrity and autonomy, Championing the momentum of the Generation Equality Forum, building on the achievements of the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women, through global multi-stakeholder partnerships to reach gender equality by 2030, and reiterating our commitments to the blueprints of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, reflected in the Global Acceleration Plan for Gender Equality as well as the Young Feminist Manifesto, Recognizing the complexity of the challenges before us with gender inequality being perpetuated by multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, deeply rooted social and gender norms, gender unequal structures as well as misconceptions about the rights of women and girls, Acknowledging that gender inequality, perpetuated by gender unequal structures, norms and attitudes, remains one of the most pervasive impediments to bodily autonomy, Expressing deep concern about the global pushback and backtracking of the hard fought gains and the shrinking civic space for the women's movements to operate, especially since the presence of an autonomous feminist movement is a critical factor to drive policy change, Reminding that exercising bodily autonomy means access to free and informed choice, unhindered by demographic, economic, social, political, environmental or security barriers, as articulated in the State of the World Population Report 2023 “8 Billion Lives, Infinite Possibilities: The Case for Rights and Choices”, Celebrating the examples of progress witnessed globally, offering a glimpse of hope, in terms of progressive legislation on reproductive rights, and the significant contributions made by civil society, including women-led organizations, the girls and women´s feminist movement, and networks fighting for bodily autonomy from local to global levels. We call on all stakeholders to: ● Leverage the momentum of the ICPD30 Review to reaffirm, recommit and expand the range of stakeholders globally in support of all women and girls´ bodily autonomy, ● Harness and accelerate collective actions and partnerships towards the implementation of the blueprint of the Action Coalition on Bodily Autonomy and SRHR, as well as synergies across all Action Coalitions, ● Expand efforts to ensure all women and girls have the power of choice and decision-making to realize bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights, and live free of genderbased violence and harmful practices — as essentials for achieving the SDGs and a sustainable future, ● Innovate and identify approaches, particularly to support, finance and engage women-led organizations, the feminist movement, including young feminists, to engage in collective action towards a stronger movement for bodily autonomy, leveraging the potential of the ICPD mandate, ● Increase international financing for the accelerated implementation of the ICPD Programme of Action, to complement and catalyze domestic financing, in particular of sexual and reproductive health programmes, and other supportive measures and interventions that promote gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment, ● Invest in and strengthen evidence informed and rights based policies and programmes in support of all women and girls’ bodily autonomy and sexual and reproductive health and rights.   Cover illustration by Daniela Yankova for The Greats

ippf-women-deliver
news item

| 13 July 2023

IPPF at Women Deliver 2023

IPPF is a proud participant of Women Deliver 2023. IPPF will be involved in a series of panel discussions, virtual sessions and events concerning accountability, bodily autonomy, global abortion rights, gender equality, comprehensive sexuality education and reproductive justice. See below a schedule of our in-person and virtual activities. For more information and to register for the conference, click here.    Sunday 16th July Pre-conference: Catalyzing global action to end female genital mutilation or cutting Co-organized by Orchid Project, ARROW, The Global Platform to End FGM/C, End FGM European Network, Sahiyo, Equality Now, Amref Health Africa, The Girl Generation, IPPF ARAB World Region, U.S. End FGM/C Network, and End FGM Canada Network Time: 8:30-17:30 Location: Simba Ballroom, Four Points Sheraton    Tuesday 18th July Virtual session: Reforming legal frameworks for sex work to strengthen access to SRHR and the fight against GBV against sex workers Co-organized by Médecins du Monde, IPPF, ESWA, Nikat Charitable Association and NSWP Time: 10:45-12:00 Location: Virtual   Wednesday 19th July Side event: Beyond Marriage & Motherhood: The forgotten girl brides of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Co-hosted by the Australian government, IPPF, MSI, Burnet, UNICEF & UNFPA Time: 7:00-8:30 Location: Kigali Conference Centre, Theatre Side event: Igniting intergenerational power: Advancing Health and Gender Equality for Women of All Ages Co-organized by HelpAge Int, WHO, Equality Now & IPPFAR Time: 15.45-17:00 Location: Solidarity Space within the Kigali Conference Centre   Thursday 20th July Concurrent session: Breaking the Binary: Strengthening sexual and gender minority inclusion in SRH Co-organized by IPPF, USAID, Agency for All, Breakthrough Action & HDI Rwanda Time: 9:30-11:00 Location: Room MH3.2, Kigali Conference Center Virtual session: Reframing the MISP: SRH for all in crisis situations Co-organized by IPPF & YouAct (The European Youth Network on Sexual and Reproductive Rights) Time:12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual Virtual session: Silence on Infertility: Catalyzing rights-based pathways for fertility care Co-organized by IPPF & ShareNet Time: 12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual   For more information and to register for Women Deliver 2023, click here. 

ippf-women-deliver
news_item

| 13 July 2023

IPPF at Women Deliver 2023

IPPF is a proud participant of Women Deliver 2023. IPPF will be involved in a series of panel discussions, virtual sessions and events concerning accountability, bodily autonomy, global abortion rights, gender equality, comprehensive sexuality education and reproductive justice. See below a schedule of our in-person and virtual activities. For more information and to register for the conference, click here.    Sunday 16th July Pre-conference: Catalyzing global action to end female genital mutilation or cutting Co-organized by Orchid Project, ARROW, The Global Platform to End FGM/C, End FGM European Network, Sahiyo, Equality Now, Amref Health Africa, The Girl Generation, IPPF ARAB World Region, U.S. End FGM/C Network, and End FGM Canada Network Time: 8:30-17:30 Location: Simba Ballroom, Four Points Sheraton    Tuesday 18th July Virtual session: Reforming legal frameworks for sex work to strengthen access to SRHR and the fight against GBV against sex workers Co-organized by Médecins du Monde, IPPF, ESWA, Nikat Charitable Association and NSWP Time: 10:45-12:00 Location: Virtual   Wednesday 19th July Side event: Beyond Marriage & Motherhood: The forgotten girl brides of Southeast Asia and the Pacific Co-hosted by the Australian government, IPPF, MSI, Burnet, UNICEF & UNFPA Time: 7:00-8:30 Location: Kigali Conference Centre, Theatre Side event: Igniting intergenerational power: Advancing Health and Gender Equality for Women of All Ages Co-organized by HelpAge Int, WHO, Equality Now & IPPFAR Time: 15.45-17:00 Location: Solidarity Space within the Kigali Conference Centre   Thursday 20th July Concurrent session: Breaking the Binary: Strengthening sexual and gender minority inclusion in SRH Co-organized by IPPF, USAID, Agency for All, Breakthrough Action & HDI Rwanda Time: 9:30-11:00 Location: Room MH3.2, Kigali Conference Center Virtual session: Reframing the MISP: SRH for all in crisis situations Co-organized by IPPF & YouAct (The European Youth Network on Sexual and Reproductive Rights) Time:12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual Virtual session: Silence on Infertility: Catalyzing rights-based pathways for fertility care Co-organized by IPPF & ShareNet Time: 12:30-13:45 Location: Virtual   For more information and to register for Women Deliver 2023, click here. 

Change Makers Wanted:
news item

| 18 April 2023

Change Makers Wanted:

Links to all IPPF Secretariat vacancies below.  Download Strategy (2023-2028) Opportunities by Geography:   Learn More About IPPF 

Change Makers Wanted:
news_item

| 25 April 2023

Change Makers Wanted:

Links to all IPPF Secretariat vacancies below.  Download Strategy (2023-2028) Opportunities by Geography:   Learn More About IPPF